The best of Milan Fashion Week for men SS23: Moschino, Versace, Prada and Fendi

0

Bye, amori! Indeed, to London comes Milan, and this season we were privy to a wealth of premium fashion at the city’s SS23 Menswear Week. From increased norm core at prada to maximalist exuberance Versacewacky visual puns JW Anderson to the rise of courageous young talents like Magliano, this was a season when Milanese menswear – which can be a bit predictable at times – felt particularly diverse, with a touch of fresh creative energy in the air. Here we give you the full facts on what happened in Italy’s most stylish city.

Emporio Armani SS23 Men's Show
Emporio Armani SS23 Men's Show

Images courtesy of gorunway.com

Emporio Armani

One of the qualities that has most clearly characterized the SS23 men’s collections we’ve seen so far is an airy sense of optimism, a lightness that feels like a counterpoint to the more peacock-like spirit we’ve seen so often for SS22 to have. That stood out Emporio Armani, who has delivered a collection that skilfully walks the line between urban sophistication and vacation-ready carefreeness. The sharpness of lightweight wool blazers was balanced by floaty wide-leg pants that floated with every step, while vertical slits and playfully ripped collars brought a certain hot-boy summer sensuality to the mix. A craft sensibility informed sky to sea blue jacquards and prints that had the free feel of spontaneous brushstrokes, as well as moments of crochet and heaviness marinate Knitwear, all offset by sporty tracksuits in contrasting tones. While the note the show ended on – a Caucasian male model with long matted dreadlocks dancing down the runway to a reggae soundtrack – felt a bit dated, it was otherwise a thoroughly contemporary show for the summer ahead.

fendi

Public holidays. It’s a topic you’re likely to hear a lot about during the SS23 season as – as you’ve probably noticed if you’ve been to an airport lately – everyone seems to have gotten the travel bug. Designers, of course, are no less concerned than any of us, with the prospect of no longer having to just dream about jetting, but actually being able to do so, offering a deluge of holiday-ready clothes to usher in this new age of free travel . That was certainly the sentiment that pervaded Silvia Venturini’s men’s collection fendi presented today in a Milan so hot it felt like a tropical locale to itself. “Approaching summer wear as a journey around the world to vacation destinations near and far,” as the show notes, it was a work imbued with an airiness enjoyment of life. Boxy, long-lined blazers with peaked lapels in sandy beige and Mediterranean blue were worn by shirtless boys in bucket hats, who also wore louches, wide-legged wool pants, and loose caftan shirts adorned with floral needlepoint embroidery with cheerful splashes of kitsch. Go here for the full review.

Jordanluca SS23 Men's Show
Jordanluca SS23 Men's Show
Jordanluca SS23 Men's Show

Images courtesy of gorunway.com

Jordanluca

Self-sabotage is a basic human value, one could argue. As we walk the path of life, we ourselves are the ones who most often put obstacles in our way. That’s where Jordan Bowden and Luca Marchetto kicked off this season with their decadently evocative collection titled Sabotage. Inspired by the Freudian idea of ​​the “death drive,” the counterintuitive impulse that drives us to what many would say, making all the wrong decisions, the London label explored why we’re all so compelled to screw things up for ourselves, like moths drawn to a flame. One thing the duo certainly didn’t screw up was the clothes themselves. Tailoring and outerwear were proportionately boxy and expertly crafted, with gigantic horizontal slits that went from sleeve to sleeve and were reconnected by shiny metal zippers. Sometimes the pieces were styled with open zippers, resulting in sleeves gaping at the biceps. Elsewhere, denims were brutally ripped and the brand’s signature trousers, a bottom-heavy, slightly gothic silhouette, dragged across the floor, all serving as visual ciphers for the collection’s contemplative theme.

Versace

Let’s get one thing straight: Versace isn’t just a brand – it’s a fucking lifestyle! It’s easy to see that when you attend one of the house’s shows, which take place in the expansive garden of the Milanese palazzo it calls home. While the usual clique of press, buyers and co. It was the first fashion show for men in three years. The most notable visitors were the die-hard fans, who turned up in full force, decked out head-to-toe in decadent silks adorned with Versace’s outrageous Greco-Roman-inspired prints. Go here for the full review!

Magliano SS23 men's show
Magliano SS23 men's show
Magliano SS23 men's show

Images courtesy of gorunway.com

Magliano

Hauling fashion to a derelict building next to a municipal landfill site on the outskirts of Milan at 10am is admittedly a risky decision, but it is one Luchino Magliano, the eponymous founder of one of the trendiest labels for young menswear in Milan, was ready to take. Mercifully, it easily paid off among the highlights of the week with its emotionally charged presentation. Along a glass runway installed in front of intricately assembled vintage benches and chairs, a remarkably diverse (especially for notoriously institutional Milan) cast of models strolled and lingered through the seedy space like ghosts from its past. The clothes they wore had a similar ghostly feel to them – shirts were draped in satin and lined gossamer or wrapped, knotted and belted haphazardly; Pants had a subtly ballooning proportion, and oversized suits hung off the shoulder. The earthy palette of looks contributed to the quiet melancholy that seemed to linger over this season’s offering, although it wouldn’t quite be fair to say that it culminated in a sense of gloom. Rather, what was on display here was a confident display of an emotional rawness, evident in the collection’s rough-hewn edges, hearty textures and garments such as a heartbroken souvenir sweater and dirty-kneed blue denim jeans. Milan isn’t exactly a city known for its up-and-coming talent, but Magliano is doing a damn good job of proving why maybe that should change.

prada

In fashion, composition is everything – changing the context in which you see a particular look or garment can dramatically change how you perceive it. It was notable, then, that upon entering the Fondazione Prada’s deposito for the house’s SS23 menswear show, guests were greeted by a vast room with white paper walls accented with curtains of red gingham drapes. Freed from distraction, it provided a clean, clear space for the clothes to speak for themselves. Read the full review here.

Moschino SS23 men's show
Moschino SS23 men's show
Moschino SS23 men's show

Images courtesy of gorunway.com

Moschino

On day two of Milan Fashion Week Men’s, Jeremy Scott promoted the revival of fashion illustration, which we’ve seen a lot on the catwalks lately, in a presentation that pays homage to the life and work of artist and photographer Tony Viramontes. Best known for his bold, bright work in the early ’80s, as well as his contribution to Ray Petri’s Buffalo styling movement—a seminal moment in fashion history and a seminal factor in how fashion images look today—he’s sadly under the long list of creatives who were lost to the AIDS crisis of the late 1980s before they could receive the recognition they deserved. jeremys Moschino So men’s collection was a posthumous attempt to give Tony his flowers and introduce his work to new eyes. Inspired by the bold color palettes of his work, the suit was cast in a range of rainbow colors, with colored flourishes and glittery embroidery from Tony’s illustrations. That camp feel was grounded by the somber punkiness of leather baker boy hats, wrap skirts and calf-length boots, resulting in a suitably inclusive and overdue toast to an iconic artist.

JW Anderson SS23 Men's Show
JW Anderson SS23 Men's Show
JW Anderson SS23 Men's Show

Images courtesy of gorunway.com

JW Anderson

If you can expect something from a JW Anderson, it’s, you guessed it, the unexpected. As the undisputed king of fashion’s haute-wackiness – both at this eponymous label and during his tenure at Lion – Jonathan has developed a flair for fusing a distinct sensibility for luxurious ready-to-wear with a left-wing esotericism – a very little-of-everything-but-the-sink approach. This season, at the brand’s postponed Milan show, the remit expanded from Jonathan’s object-oriented approach to sweaters with built-in snap-fastening skateboards; striped sweaters casually draped over bike handlebar ‘necklaces’, for lack of a better description; Boxy t-shirts were riddled with peeled lid vents and reattached with door hinges. While the punchline of these wearable puns has been deliberately left enigmatic – “Why?” One publication quipped “Only the viewer can tell, and perhaps there is no reason for it” – but they’ve been bolstered by a sizable offering of clothing that certainly made sense. A mesmerizing distressed intarsia pullover with distorted QR code motifs all over; Sweater and shoes with a “cheeky” self-portrait by Rembrandt, the Dutch doyen; trompe-l’oeil jersey slip dresses with cut-off denim jeans appliquéd on the top half; and, sure to be instant bestsellers, glittering riffs on JW Anderson’s vociferous bumper bags.

Giorgio Armani SS23 Men's Show
Giorgio Armani SS23 Men's Show
Giorgio Armani SS23 Men's Show

Images courtesy of gorunway.com

Giorgio Armani

The last day of Milan Fashion Week Men’s was opened by one of the city’s great advocates – Giorgio Armani. For his latest collection for his empire’s luxury menswear range, he presented a collection that reveled in the house’s ’90s signatures that archive-hungry gen-zers are now rediscovering — baggy, satin-like cuts that convey a more sensual masculinity than much Italian Men’s suit. Louche yet structured silhouettes arrived in stony gray and soft sky and Mediterranean blue and were worn with fine knit sweaters with poppy geometric patterns, while zings of eccentric dyed royal purple jackets and silk shirts with delicate tree and giant logo prints.

Keep following iD Instagram and tick tock for more from the SS23 menswear shows.

Share.

Comments are closed.